He’s not interested in people who need help

 

Mitt Romney isn’t going for the votes of people who need help paying their bills, buying food, getting health care or keeping a roof over their heads in the face of falling wages and high unemployment.

Mitt cares only about the wealthy who are hoarding America’s financial resources and contributing to the needs of the rest of us rather than helping to solve the problem.

That 47 percent of America that pays no income taxes still pays sales taxes, gasoline taxes, school taxes and more. And the reason they don’t pay income taxes is because their wages are being held artificially low.

The 1 percent has gotten wealthier and wealthier, and none of what they’re hoarding is trickling down to help that 47 percent who can’t even meet their most basic needs without help.

Should such things as health care, nutritious food and a roof over one’s head be considered basic human rights? Well, here’s where I differ with Mitt and his cronies — I believe these things should be seen as rights.

There is enough to go around. In fact, there’s plenty for everyone; it’s just that the 1 percent won’t be satisfied until the rest of us are their indentured servants.

Somehow, the oligarchs have convinced millions of Americans to vote against their own best interests. Just look at the map. You’ll notice that the places that pay the least taxes are also the places where the schools are the worst and critical-thinking skills the lowest.

Thirty years ago, the salaries and bonuses CEOs are paying themselves today would have been unconscionable. There was a moral aversion to such theft and greed. Somehow, though, they’ve convinced Americans that they’re worth it, even though they led us to the brink of worldwide financial disaster.

Mitt’s lack of compassion for fellow human beings is appalling. The people I work with, most of whom can’t work because of illness or disability, are deserving of the dignity of having their needs met. Perhaps Mitt and cronies believe people who can’t “contribute” should be put to death. I suppose that would leave more money for them.

Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz details the economic inequality in our country in his latest book, The Price of Inequality. And while conservatives think the economists on the Right who espouse “trickle-down” economics know what they’re talking about, I’ll go with the Nobel Prize winner.

I’d say he knows more than I do, and apparently, a whole lot more than Mitt Romney and his advisors.

 

2 comments

  1. Lyte says:

    I am one of that 47% who will vote for Obama. How insulting to suddenly learn that I must be a person who doesn’t pay taxes, takes no responsibility for my own life, and lives as a victim looking for my next handout from the government. Wow… and here I thought I’d been gainfully employed since 1966, paid taxes every year, and feel pretty damn well empowered about life. Good grief, Mitt. Just how blind are you???

  2. Ron says:

    The more wealthy people the more jobs they create!! Think Bill Gates, Steve Jobs who are and we’re both 1%’s. they sure do & did hoard a lot of money, they are not like the rest of us. They have creative talent and business minds that the rest of us wish we had. I wish there were 10,000 billionaires world wide(that is the ones making it on their own skills and talent, not special government treatment or being a drug lord). The term “Robber Baron” comes to mind(GE, Solindra, etc.), enriching themselves by govt. protection or favors, at the tax payers expense. Those of us who go to work(we did our homework in school so we could actually get a job) and pay the taxes are real tired of the many free loaders collecting all the many govt. programs and doing nothing but showing arogance to the rest of us. Yes there are those who need our help, and we will always be there for them, but the rest of the abuses need to pay their own way. You can say whatever you want, but you have no self esteem, no pride, and only deserve what you earn like the rest of us.

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